The Rolls-Royce Phantom: True Luxury for Texans

by Alex Temblador on March 2, 2018 in Lifestyle, Living Texas, Dallas/Fort Worth,

It’s Oscar weekend— time to take the perfect red carpet ride!

As Texans, we like our space whether it’s on our property, in the way our cities are laid out, or in our cars. Furthermore, we understand that we don’t have to sacrifice quality for size – we can have both. That’s exactly why Texans will love the Rolls-Royce Phantom. It’s top-notch luxury combined with spacious interiors and a smooth ride.

While the Rolls-Royce Phantom was introduced to the world in 1925, today it’s better and more luxurious than ever. When a chance to experience the Rolls-Royce Phantom at the Rosewood Mansion on Turtle Creek presented itself, I jumped on the opportunity.

Originally released in 1925, the Rolls-Royce Phantom has been updated to be more luxurious and spacious than ever. The stunning Rosewood Mansion on Turtle Creek was the perfect place to take a test drive. Courtesy photo

When I arrived at the mansion, the driver opened the iconic coach doors, and I slid into the spacious backseat — not missing the fact that the beloved Rolls-Royce umbrella could still be found in the car door. After closing the automatic door with a button on the interior, I took plenty of time to play with the car gadgets and features.

The star-lit roof was dazzling as it sparkled in the glass flutes and bubbles of champagne kept cool in the interior compartment. Buttons heated my seat, started a soothing back massage, and opened a flat-screen TV on the back of the front seat that allowed me to scroll on a touch screen for music. I adjusted a foot rest and leaned the seat back. The features of the Rolls-Royce Phantom quickly made me feel special and relaxed.

Something amazing happened as soon as we took off.

The Dallas traffic noise ceased to exist thanks to the all-aluminum space frame architecture and layers of felt and foam. Lovingly referred to as the Magic Carpet Ride, this feature on the Rolls-Royce Phantom makes it feel like you are riding on air; however, the full extent of this feature is best experienced as you drive. Turns are smoother, making it easy to do U-turns without needing extra space. Gone is the stiffness felt in most cars – something you don’t even realize until you drive a Rolls-Royce Phantom. 

“Riding up to the luxurious Rosewood Mansion on Turtle Creek in the Rolls-Royce Phantom was an experience in itself – it was clear that I was riding in the best of the best, and in Texas, don’t we all just love things that are bigger and better?” Courtesy photo

Plus, with such a light frame, it’s fun to hit the gas and experience the true power of the Phantom’s V12 engine. Some have clocked the power and speed at 5 seconds from zero to 60 mph. (Most trucks just can’t compete with that.)

Sitting in the front seat, there are even more features to delight a Texan. The four-camera system allows you to see the car from above and other cars around you. From the driver’s seat, there’s a digital display in the windshield that shows your driving route and the speed limit, so you don’t have to look down at your dash. And I can’t forget to mention the lovely gallery. Just as Rolls-Royces can be customized in terms of interiors, the gallery is a glass space where owners can display pictures, small sculptures or the artwork of kids and grandkids, making the Rolls-Royce Phantom even more personal.

The Phantom’s V12 engine caters to anyone with a need for speed with the ability to go from zero to 60 mph in five seconds. Courtesy photo

Driving through the streets of Dallas, it’s clear that the Rolls-Royce Phantom turns heads in ways that most Texas automobile favorites just don’t. Riding up to the luxurious Rosewood Mansion on Turtle Creek in the Rolls-Royce Phantom was an experience in itself – it was clear that I was riding in the best of the best, and in Texas, don’t we all just love things that are bigger and better?


Cover: The author in front of the Rosewood Mansion on Turtle Creek with a lineup of Rolls-Royce Phantoms. Courtesy photo