What’s The Hype With Activated Charcoal?

by Nick Bailey on April 28, 2016 in Lifestyle, Wellness,
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Sometimes, in order to get clean, you have to get a little dirty. This is a concept that humanity has known for thousands of years with our long history of mud baths — but it’s not just about mud anymore. Recently, the trendy new get-dirty-to-get-clean ingredient is activated charcoal, which has been making its way into skin- and hair-care products and into homes across the state. But what’s all the hype about? International brand expert Patrice N. Le Maire seems to have some insight on the topic, and why it’s popularity is growing across the state.

“In particular, young women – Millennials – have been appreciating the benefits of activated charcoal within the past year or two,” he says. “Now we’re starting to see the ingredient gain ground for women in their 30s, 40s and 50s, as well as men with an active lifestyle, who stand to benefit from a deep and thorough cleansing.”

Courtesy photo
Courtesy photo

Activated coal has even made its way into toothpaste. Last month, we discussed activated coal in toothpaste, looking at both sides of the argument in which Le Maire, shed some light on the potential benefits of the ingredient. Now he’s back, with more candid explanations for some of the larger benefits of the getting dirty to get clean.

“Many younger folks enjoy the all-natural ingredient; we’ve raised a generation of people who do not like too much artificiality in their products,” he says. “And, they do not like to come off artificial, either. After about a week or two of use, the activated charcoal helps your teeth look a natural white – the color of baby’s teeth – and not the super-bright, artificial white offered by bleaching products, which can damage one’s enamel.”

To a significant extent, Millennials in Texas have had a different upbringing from just about everyone else, and they’re motivated by novel and natural systems of getting the job done.

“Many Millennials were brought up in a do-it-yourself mentality,” Le Maire says. “They were the first generation to be raised with access to the internet, a treasure trove of information that explains to people exactly how things work, enabling them to experiment with raw ingredients. Millennials, and many others who enjoy outside-the-box thinking, have learned to appreciate the raw elements of products they use.”

It’s amazing to think that only a few decades ago, Texans weren’t the connoisseurs of coffee, beer and wine that they are today. The idea of paying more than a couple of dollars for coffee was practically unheard of.

A few decades ago, Americans weren’t the connoisseurs of coffee and wine they are today. The thought of paying more than a dollar or two for a coffee was unheard of. Now with more Texans consuming these teeth-tarnishing joys more than ever, it looks as though having a more natural cleaning agent may be of some real benefit.

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